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clinmed/1999120014v1 (December 17, 1999)
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Quality of Patient Information on the Orthopaedic Internet

Christopher W. Oliver, and William A. Doward

More and more patients are looking for credible orthopaedic patient information on the Internet and it is now common to meet a patient armed with information who has surfed the web prior to medical consultation. Well-informed patients may change the role of a surgeon to more of an advocate and with little or no mechanisms available at present to limit or edit sites this may create problems. The aim of this study was to assess orthopaedic websites regarding "orthopaedic patient information" using four core standards; authorship, attribution, disclosure and currency.


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Search strategies and patient competence
David Green
ClinMed NetPrints, 21 Dec 1999 [Full text]



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