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clinmed/2000050003v1 (May 15, 2000)
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Urinary tract symptoms: Communicating information and primary health care advice for women through the lay literature

Elizabeth M Rink

Abstract: Patients have access to a variety of sources of information about medical matters. This paper looks at the information available in the UK lay press about the prevention and alleviation of urinary tract symptoms (cystitis), a common condition often managed by women themselves, without or before recourse to a medical advisor. Much of the information is based on old wives tales, not on scientific evidence, and where there is some scientific refutation of such old advice and or remedies these still retain credence in both lay and medical culture. The lay press has much to offer in communication health information to the general public. Health professionals should encourage the publication of accurate, accessible and scientifically evidence based material in women's and other popular magazines.





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