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clinmed/2002050005v1 (May 16, 2002)
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Influence of school education on attitudes towards transferable skills in medical undergraduates

Ravi P Shankar, and Pranaya Mishra

Abstract: Background: The increasing importance of self-learning in medical education places a greater responsibility on individual students to develop good ‘transferable’ skills. Objectives: To assess the attitudes of second year undergraduates towards transferable skills, and to investigate the influence of schooling on these skills. Methods: Second year students were given a questionnaire asking them to rate the importance, their level of competence and influence of teaching on transferable skills and to note the influence of exposure to computers, self-learning sessions and problem-solving sessions on these skills. To assess any influence of the importance of self-learning in school on these skills. Results: Responses were obtained from 68 students. Only 25 students were exposed to problem-solving sessions in school while 42 students were exposed to presentations. The majority of the students rated self-learning as important in school. Those students who had not been exposed to computers, self-learning and problem-solving in school rated the influence of integrated teaching on skill development higher than those not exposed. The students who rated the importance of self-learning in school as not important rated the influence of integrated teaching on the development of individual skills lower than the students who rated self-learning as important. Conclusion: The influence of schooling on transferable skills development should be further investigated.


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Ravi P Shankar
ClinMed NetPrints, 27 Jan 2003 [Full text]



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