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clinmed/2002050006v1 (May 16, 2002)
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Student feedback on the objective structured component of the practical examination in pharmacology

Ravi P Shankar, and Pranaya Mishra

Abstract: The study was planned to determine the attitude of undergraduate medical students towards the objective structured practical examination (OSPE) in pharmacology and to investigate any influence of sex, nationality and medium of instruction at school on these attitudes. The second year undergraduate medical students of the Manipal college of medical sciences, Pokhara, Nepal were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding the spotters and communication skills component of the practical examination. Students considered OSPE a good method of practical examination. The male students agreed more strongly that the spotters develops the ability to choose an appropriate drug while the female students were more in favour of OSPE over animal experimentation. The Sri Lankan students were less in favour of the introduction of stations testing skills as part of OSPE and also disagreed strongly with the point that communication skills should be conducted in a language other than English. Based on these observations, changes should be made in the teaching as well as evaluation methodologies to maximise learning.


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Ravi P Shankar
ClinMed NetPrints, 27 Jan 2003 [Full text]



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